Concurrent Session Descriptions

Block One: Monday, January 25, 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm (EST)

Audience: Faculty and Staff
Promoting Anti-Racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member, Part I

Promoting Anti-Racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member, Part I

Are you a White faculty/staff member who is eager to engage with anti-racist work in your day-to-day, but you wish you: a) knew more about systemic racism, and/or b) had better facilitation skills to help you more meaningfully engage with others? Maybe you have had some initial conversations with colleagues or have facilitated some class/programmatic activities with students, but you now feel stuck or maybe your activities even went sideways. For emerging White anti-racists, these are common feelings and experiences. In this session, we will aim to work through some of these common emotional, practical, and intellectual roadblocks by providing you with the knowledge and skills necessary to start seeing and interacting with our racialized reality in a way that promotes continuous, substantial, and deeply personal anti-racist learning, reflection, and action. PLEASE NOTE: This is a two-block session scheduled from 12:30 pm - 3:15 pm.

Audience: Anyone
Dialogue as a Mechanism for Social Change
  • Block One | Mon 12:30
  • Camila Adrianzén Yndigoyen '23 & Ana Ostrovsky '23
  • Register

Dialogue as a Mechanism for Social Change

Presented by the student co-coordinators of the Agnes Gund '60 Dialogue Project, this workshop will introduce the potential of dialogue to be used as a mechanism for social change within our Conn community. The workshop will be framed and formatted as a facilitated Dialogue session, starting with a brief identity reflection and then introducing the concept of Dialogue and how it differs from other group learning methods. We will then transition into teaching content about specific dialogue skills around navigating conflict and problem solving. During the final portion of the workshop, we will reflect and consider how this work connects to the larger picture at Conn. We will share our goals and vision as a project, what this has looked like at other schools and then immediate next steps for what Dialogue can mean for students.

Audience: Anyone
What Lies Within: Dancing with Race & Identity
  • Block One | Mon 12:30
  • Sarah Carlson '94
  • Register

What Lies Within: Dancing with Race & Identity

Sarah Carlson, Connecticut College alumna from the class of 1994 and Artistic Director of DanceLink, presents excerpts from "What Lies Within: Dancing with Race & Identity" which was created in collaboration with Basement Poetry in 2017. Dance and poetry come together in this moving program that highlights a spectrum of perspectives from white racial awakening, to the hardships of being racially targeted, to the angst of mothers both black and white. Ms. Carlson will discuss the creative process and critically analyze both its successes and failures.

Audience: Anyone
Interfaith Coalition Building

Interfaith Coalition Building

Noah Silverman, a Connecticut College alum from the class of 2004 and Senior Director of Strategic Partnerships at Interfaith Youth Core, will follow up on the themes presented in the MLK address by his colleague Eboo Patel. Specifically, participants will be led through an interactive workshop on how to incorporate interfaith cooperation into the culture of social action within institutions and communities. This session will include Angela Nzegwu, director of the Office of Religious and Spiritual Programs, College Chaplains, and leaders of faith-based student organizations.

Block Two: Monday, January 25, 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm (EST)

Audience: Anyone
Roundtable Discussion: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Professionals
  • Block Two | Mon 2:00
  • DEI Professionals
  • Register

Roundtable Discussion: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Professionals

There are numerous Connecticut College alumni across several generations who are working in various industries as diversity, equity, and inclusion professionals. We will have a roundtable discussion with a few of these leaders about the challenges of creating inclusive workplace environments. Panelists include: Erica Lovett '14 (pictured), Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Cartier North America, Jonathan McBride '92, former Global Head of Diversity at BlackRock and former Director of Presidential Personnel under the Obama administration, Liza Talusan '97, diversity educator and consultant, and Frank Tuitt '87, Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer at the University of Connecticut. The roundtable will be moderated by Ebony Manning '98 and Maurice Tiner '17.

Audience: Anyone
How to Write an Anti-Racism Action Plan
  • Block Two | Mon 2:00
  • Kasey Catlett
  • Register

How to Write an Anti-Racism Action Plan

We are called in the current moment to actively move from non-racist thinking to anti-racist actions - moving from theory to practice. This session will focus on how students, faculty, and administration can create and work towards anti-racist efforts within the institution. Participants will navigate the “How to Write an Anti-Racism Action Plan Guidebook," and learn ways to incorporate it into their areas of influence.

Audience: Faculty & Staff
Green Dot Training
  • Block Two | Mon 2:00
  • Stanton Ching & Rachel Stewart
  • Register

Green Dot Training

Green Dot is a national violence prevention program, implemented by the College in 2010, that trains students, faculty and staff in bystander intervention to help prevent sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. A "Green Dot" is defined as any behavior, choice, word, or attitude that counters or displaces a "red dot" of violence, promoting safety for everyone and communicating utter intolerance for sexual violence, interpersonal violence and stalking. Green Dot encourages bystanders (everyone will be one at some point) to make a choice and then take action by doing something to prevent violence from happening in our community.

Audience: Faculty & Staff
Promoting Anti-Racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member, Part II
  • Block Two | Mon 2:00
  • Paul Madden
  • Register in Block One

Promoting Anti-Racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member, Part II

Are you a White faculty/staff member who is eager to engage with anti-racist work in your day-to-day, but you wish you: a) knew more about systemic racism, and/or b) had better facilitation skills to help you more meaningfully engage with others? Maybe you have had some initial conversations with colleagues or have facilitated some class/programmatic activities with students, but you now feel stuck or maybe your activities even went sideways. For emerging White anti-racists, these are common feelings and experiences. In this session, we will aim to work through some of these common emotional, practical, and intellectual roadblocks by providing you with the knowledge and skills necessary to start seeing and interacting with our racialized reality in a way that promotes continuous, substantial, and deeply personal anti-racist learning, reflection, and action. PLEASE NOTE: This is a two-block session scheduled from 12:30 pm - 3:15 pm. Register for this session in Block One.

Block Three: Tuesday, January 26, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm (EST)

Audience: Advanced Faculty & Staff
Activities and Frameworks for White Staff and/or White Faculty Members Looking to Advance Students' (and our own/Colleagues) Anti-Racist Identity Development, Part I
  • Block Three | Tues 11:00
  • Paul Madden
  • Register

Activities and Frameworks for White Staff and/or White Faculty Members Looking to Advance Students' (and our own/Colleagues) Anti-Racist Identity Development, Part I

Do you feel moderately comfortable engaging in conversations about race/racism, but want to start engaging in more targeted, purposeful dialogue with students and/or colleagues in support of creating anti-racist classrooms and/or workplaces? In this session we will engage with anti-racist frameworks and pedagogical activities that will aim to connect our anti-racist knowledge/skills more directly with our day-to-day, “on-task” work of our classrooms/offices. In particular this session will focus on using concepts generatively to help us understand how systemic racism manifests internally, interpersonally, institutionally, and ideologically in our work/ fields/ classrooms in support of advancing students’/colleagues’ anti-racist identity development. Moving toward action, participants will not only engage in three pedagogical activities aimed at deepening folks understanding of race/racism, but will also create a meaningful activity relevant to their context(s). This session is recommended for all white faculty and staff who have either attended “Promoting Anti-racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member” or who have been continuously engaged in anti-racist work for at least one to two full years. Please NOTE: This session will take place in two parts, from 11:00 - 12:15pm and from 1:15pm - 2:30pm.

Audience: Anyone
In CONNversation: Dialogue Project Podcast Premiere
  • Block Three | Tues 11:00
  • Camila Adrianzén Yndigoyen '23 & Ana Ostrovsky '23
  • Register

In CONNversation: Dialogue Project Podcast Premiere

This session will formally introduce the Gund Dialogue Project to our community via the new medium of a Podcast. For the first half of the session we will stage a community listening session to premiere our intro episode of the podcast: In CONNversations. The second half of the session we will have a roundtable discussion with current Gund Dialogue Project stakeholders to talk about what they feel is the potential of dialogue at Conn and share their experiences with it so far. Participants will reflect on the potential that dialogue has to change culture and advance social justice goals.

Audience: Anyone
POCA Unpacked!
  • Block Three | Tues 11:00
  • Lyndon Inglis '24, Junice Caminero '24, Leslie Villegas '24 & Francis Sesenaya '24
  • Register

POCA Unpacked!

This session will unpack the mission and vision of the People of Color Alliance (POCA), an upcoming affinity-based student organization on campus. We are establishing POCA to create an intentionally intersectional space on a predominantly white campus. This session will introduce the POCA leadership team, all first-year students, who will share information about POCA's plans for the spring term and beyond.

Block Four: Tuesday, January 26, 1:15 pm - 2:30 pm (EST)

Audience: Anyone
Dance as a Practice for Liberation: A Movement Workshop Celebrating Haiti's 216th Independence Day as the World's first Black-led Republic.
  • Block Four | Tues 1:15
  • Shani Collins & Truth Hunter
  • Register

Dance as a Practice for Liberation: A Movement Workshop Celebrating Haiti's 216th Independence Day as the World's first Black-led Republic.

This movement workshop, co-facilitated by Truth Hunter and Shani Collins, will create a space for participants to practice connection, resilience, and liberation in our bodies. The session will acknowledge how the voices and the experiences of African people have been marginalized and participants will collectively explore how we can recapture and validate silenced voices. As we develop physical endurance through body strengthening and conditioning, participants will learn liberation dances from Haiti. Collectively we will celebrate Haiti's 216th Independence Day as the World's first Black-led republic. This workshop requires no prior dance knowledge or experience. It is for Every Body.

Audience: Anyone
Global Engagement and Erasure on the Liberal Arts Campus

Global Engagement and Erasure on the Liberal Arts Campus

In debates leading up to the passage of the British East India Company’s “English Education Act 1835,” the Whig politician and historian Thomas Babbington Macaulay produced his famous “Minute on Education,” notoriously arguing that no one “could deny that a single shelf of a good European library was worth the whole native literature of India and Arabia.” Macaulay’s argument carried the day in colonial India 185 years ago. Does the curricular (under)representation of the Global South across the humanities and social science departments of twenty-first century U.S. liberal arts institutions not suggest at least tacit agreement with – and adherence to – Macaulay’s nineteenth century colonial perspective?

Audience: Students
Tools for Change: Community Organizing Basics for Campus Activism
  • Block Four | Tues 1:15
  • Erin Duran, Ariella Rotramel & Rachel Stewart
  • Register

Tools for Change: Community Organizing Basics for Campus Activism

The workshop presenters will share key practices from community organizing to draw upon for student-led campus advocacy efforts. We will combine self-reflection and interpersonal skills with the analytical tools necessary to bring together people around social justice issues. Through our discussion of case studies, we highlight key elements of self-assessment, frame and power analyses, and one-on-one organizing strategies. Participants will work together to practice these techniques to understand their own topics of interest. Together, we intend to build a working sense of community organizing tactics and how we can incorporate them into our own efforts.

Audience: Advanced Faculty & Staff
Activities and Frameworks for White Staff and/or White Faculty Members Looking to Advance Students' (and our own/Colleagues) Anti-Racist Identity Development, Part II
  • Block Four | Tues 1:15
  • Paul Madden
  • Register in Block Three

Activities and Frameworks for White Staff and/or White Faculty Members Looking to Advance Students' (and our own/Colleagues) Anti-Racist Identity Development, Part II

Do you feel moderately comfortable engaging in conversations about race/racism, but want to start engaging in more targeted, purposeful dialogue with students and/or colleagues in support of creating anti-racist classrooms and/or workplaces? In this session we will engage with anti-racist frameworks and pedagogical activities that will aim to connect our anti-racist knowledge/skills more directly with our day-to-day, “on-task” work of our classrooms/offices. In particular this session will focus on using concepts generatively to help us understand how systemic racism manifests internally, interpersonally, institutionally, and ideologically in our work/ fields/ classrooms in support of advancing students’/colleagues’ anti-racist identity development. Moving toward action, participants will not only engage in three pedagogical activities aimed at deepening folks understanding of race/racism, but will also create a meaningful activity relevant to their context(s). This session is recommended for all white faculty and staff who have either attended “Promoting Anti-racist Learning Contexts From the ARC to STEM as a White Staff and/or Faculty Member” or who have been continuously engaged in anti-racist work for at least one to two full years. Please NOTE: This session will take place in two parts, from 11:00 - 12:15pm and from 1:15pm - 2:30pm.

Block Five: Tuesday, January 26, 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm (EST)

Audience: Anyone
Towards an Anticolonial Stance in Critical Service Learning: Challenges and Possibilities
  • Block Five | Tues 2:35
  • Aurora Santiago Ortiz
  • Register

Towards an Anticolonial Stance in Critical Service Learning: Challenges and Possibilities

Aurora Santiago Ortiz is a social justice education scholar, lawyer, and filmmaker. Her work links anticolonial, antiracist feminist and queer social movements to community-based participatory action research in Puerto Rico, the US, and the Americas. She particularly focuses on Black, Indigenous, and women of color understandings of solidarity as a praxis of coalitional work across difference. She is one of the founding members of the Cayey Urban Hub Collective, an organization that aims to support intergenerational leadership, social justice, and dialogue in the town of Cayey, Puerto Rico.

Audience: Anyone
Out at Work: An LGBTQIA Alumni Roundtable
  • Block Five | Tues 2:35
  • Various Presenters
  • Register

Out at Work: An LGBTQIA Alumni Roundtable

The main purpose of this session is to create space for alumni to offer perspectives on if and how they share various aspects of their gender identity and sexuality within their workplace environments. Alumni panelists from various professions will give an honest portrayal of the joys and challenges of being out in the workplace and in other communities. Panelists include: Kim-An Hernandez '99, Liana Douillet Guzmán '05, and Ivan Reynolds '17 and will be moderated by Ricardo Lombera '22 (pictured). This session is open to anyone but may be of particular interest to students who are preparing to enter the workforce.

Audience: Anyone
Developing Intercultural Competence Through Story Circles
  • Block Five | Tues 2:35
  • Cara Masullo Ekwuabu, Lauren O'Leary & Melissa Ryan
  • Register

Developing Intercultural Competence Through Story Circles

Story Circles are an intercultural methodology drawing on the power and deep history of storytelling as a global form of relationship building. Based on the research of Darla K. Deardorff, Executive Director of the Association of International Education Administrators, research fellow at Duke University, and longtime researcher of intercultural competence, the Story Circle methodology was designed as an adaptable and accessible approach to fostering intercultural competencies across multiple contexts and audiences. Through small-group storytelling, participants will focus on the core tenets of empathy and listening for understanding.

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